The growing world of face recognition legislation: Our new guide to local and national regulations

The growing world of face recognition legislation: Our new guide to local and national regulations

Face recognition technology is increasingly being used by government agencies, particularly law enforcement, but while regulation of the technology is increasing, the rollout has been far from uniform. The Policing Project, with help from the Information Law Institute, conducted a review of enacted and proposed regulation across the U.S. and Canada, culminating in our new resource that analyzes trends in legislation and provides a table of nearly 200 proposed and enacted laws.

It’s time to start collecting stop data: A case for comprehensive statewide legislation

It’s time to start collecting stop data: A case for comprehensive statewide legislation

Police officers in the U.S. pull over at least 50,000 drivers every day, making the traffic stop the most common interaction between the public and police. But despite the frequency, there is a lot we don't know about stops and their effects, in part because stop data collection laws are not mandated in most states, and even when they do exist, the laws are far from perfect.

Microsoft President Brad Smith visits Policing Project to talk the future of tech and democratic accountability

Microsoft President Brad Smith visits Policing Project to talk the future of tech and democratic accountability

How should private companies, governments, and the public address concerns posed by new technologies, such as the loss of privacy, perpetuation of racial injustice, or the prospect of widespread government surveillance? Microsoft President Brad Smith recently visited NYU Law for a discussion of these issues and the new book “Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age.”

Join us for a conversation with Microsoft President Brad Smith, Sept. 13 at NYU

Join us for a conversation with Microsoft President Brad Smith, Sept. 13 at NYU

Technology has drastically shaped our society and our lives, with equal potential for both incredible good and devastating harm. Join us for a conversation with Brad Smith, President of Microsoft, to discuss his newly released book, Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age, in the context of policing technology, with special emphasis on the ethics of AI, privacy legislation and the need for regulation on facial recognition.

Policing Project drafts innovative new use of force policy for Camden

Policing Project drafts innovative new use of force policy for Camden

Today, the Camden County Police Department announced adoption of its innovative, revised use of force policy drafted with the help of the Policing Project. The new policy — vetted and revised with the ACLU of New Jersey — is one of the most progressive use of force policies in the nation.

Policing Project staff explore evidence-based policing in new editorial for Just Security

Policing Project staff explore evidence-based policing in new editorial for Just Security

How do we know what works in policing and what doesn’t? Often, the answer is, “We don’t.” As Policing Project Faculty Director Barry Friedman and extern Kate Mather explain in a new editorial for Just Security, evidence-based policing is still a niche approach struggling to find its place in mainstream law enforcement.

Leading producer of police body cameras agrees to keep face recognition off its products

Leading producer of police body cameras agrees to keep face recognition off its products

In a report produced with the Policing Project, Axon’s AI and Policing Technology Ethics Board concluded that face recognition technology is not yet reliable enough to justify its use on body-worn cameras, and expressed particular concern regarding evidence of unequal and unreliable performance across races, ethnicities, genders and other identity groups.

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